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Wingfoot Perch are HITTIN

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Old 03-06-2012, 05:08 AM   #61
Cull'in
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Originally Posted by Nipididdee View Post
Above was proposed for future public hearings last time I was present for the discussion in winter of 2011.

Wingfoot would be deemed and managed as a "Trophy lake" - hence the trophy regulation proposed above.

It would force tournaments to comply with the regulations for possession.

Then you run into the one or two angler matters....

Not sure where this is at in the process curently, I can say Wingfoot was centered in the radar for DOW to make change for trophy management of bass.

Scott Hale who is the HFGC (head fish guy in charge ) will be in my boat for the Moggie open Culln'- he's a very interesting guy to talk to and will gladly share the management plan.
Thanks for clarifying! That 14"-20" would seem perfect for a place like Wingfoot.
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Old 03-06-2012, 08:25 AM   #62
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An interesting article I found. Having some trouble posting the link.

http://www.aquaticmanagement.com/history.html

Ohio's Lake Doctor
Doctor, my lake has become mesotrophic and most certainly eutrophication is rapidly setting in; can you help me?
A lake doctor? Why not? We have doctors or experts who treat all sorts of human maladies. When our favorite hunting dog becomes sick, off to the veterinarian we go. In fact, we can even get expert advice on sick house plants or tropical fish. Doesn't it make sense that something new such as aquatic management should come along to cure a lake's ills?.

Surprisingly the answer is no - if the word "new" is left in the statement. Aquatic management, from a private standpoint, has been in Ohio since 1957, namely in the person of Francis (Frank) H. Bezdek. I first ran across Frank one day when doing a story on Wingfoot Lake. Frank Balint, Wingfoot Lake's park manager, was so impressed with the work Frank Bezdek was doing that he encouraged me to contact him. Three years later, the improved size of Wingfoot's 'gill and crappie, coupled with respectable catches of bass, walleyes and northern pike, caused me to become interested in aquatic management from a private standpoint.

I first met Francis Bezdek at the Wingfoot Park's manager's office. It was October, and Frank let me keep him company-if I didn't mind tagging along as he stocked 700 walleye, checked the fish in two trapnets and inspected 200 feet of gillnet. He did this all in about two hours-the only evidence that said he is 65 years of age is his birth certificate. He had been up since early morning, and at 5:30 in the evening he was putting my younger legs to shame.

Frank inspected each of the fish that were hauled to the boat. The walleye and northern pike seemed to receive special attention. After a careful inspection of each, a look of satisfaction would cross his face. When back in the boat, Frank explained why he was especially interested in these predators.

It seems that about 10 years ago Wingfoot was experiencing too many weeds and tried aerial spraying as a method of destroying them. This one-shot attempt was unsatisfactory, and after a thorough check, Frank Bezdek's credentials brought him to Wingfoot. Frank's experience with thousands of impoundments gave him practical experience that could be gained only from work in the field. First, Frank viewed the entire lake and found that it was 35% weed choked. Large amounts of weeds give panfish protection from predation and don't allow the game fish to keep their numbers under control. Frank pointed out that Wingfoot had loads of bluegills, but due to excess numbers, they were stunted. When questioned as to how a stunted fish can be identified, he pulled a bluegill from a trapnet and pointed to its eye. A stunted fish's eye is too large for its head. Even when an insufficient food supply retards the fish's body growth, the eye continues growing at the normal rate. Hence, stunted fish have oversized eyes. To also determine how the feed has been over the past few years, a scale can be removed and its rings analyzed. A wide space between rings indicates a good year, while a narrow band indicates a poor year, much like the rings of a tree. This scale inspection allows for careful comparative yearly monitoring.

Before any action is taken, Frank takes an inventory of the present fish population-like the examination done by a family physician. The problem must be carefully diagnosed, then its treatment prescribed and carefully watched.

Wingfoot's problem was basically too many weeds, which was not only leading to stunted panfish, but aging the lake at a rapid rate. The thick weeds were falling to the bottom, decaying and making the lake shallower. Many of the bays had extremely thick muck due to the inordinate amount of rotting weeds. The rotting weeds also caused the water to become discolored. All of this increased silting harmed the spawning areas of game fish, which prefer a clean gravel bottom.

The next stop involved the removal of weeds and creating controlled fish holding areas. Since Wingfoot Club is part of the Goodyear Rubber Company, two problems were solved with one idea: Floating tire islands were formed to offer protection and shade for baitfish and game fish. These structures can also be moved from area to area, and the fish will always be found underneath them, even after they are moved.

A lake such as Wingfoot needed more than removal of weeds. Walleye have been stocked every year, along with northern pike. After eight years, Wingfoot is experiencing a solid game fish population. While some oldtimers may bemoan the good old days of catches of 200 and 300 bluegills, the size of today's 'gills is much better and the numbers caught still are very substantial. Test nets also showed an abundant supply of 12 to 13-inch bullheads. These chunky scaleless piscators were a beneficiary of the lake management program. Five years ago the average bullhead size was a great deal smaller. Quantities of small fish were replaced with fish of quality size.The lake level has also been dropped. Why? First, if the shoreline is exposed to air and rain it allows the muck to dry out and compact. This retards the aging process of the lake while allowing rain and snow to wash the spawning gravel clean of sediments. With clean gravel, the game fish spawn will be better the following spring, and the sediment buildup will be greatly slowed. In fact, rye grass at times will be planted on this exposed shore to speed up the breakdown of these organic materials. In the spring when the water level is up again, large amounts of rye grass can darken the water's color, helping to retard a large buildup of weeds. Another reason for dropping the lake's level is that it deters erosion of the banks. On a windy day, the waves will feather against the dry, gently sloping lake bottom, thus preventing erosion. Frank prefers the use of natural controls whenever possible.

Asked why he got started in the private lake business, Frank paused. "If you stay with the government you have two choices. Either make no waves or get out," he said. After four years, he got out. It doesn't take long to understand that he's a man who speaks his piece and lets the chips fall where they may. I can take it: I have a tough skin when I need it, he says-and he sometimes needs it. Frank takes positions that run counter to some popular opinions. For example, he is not opposed to commercial fishing in Lake Erie. In one of his letters he states,

Lake Geneva in Switzerland, for one, has had commercial fishing since Roman times, and whether we like it or not, commercial netting of trash fish must continue in Lake Erie to keep these fish from taking over the lake and also ruining the sportfishing. However, catfish and whitebass are not sufficient, in and of themselves, to keep the Ohio commercial fishermen afloat especially with the investment the fishermen have and the wages (with no investment) many other jobs pay in the private sector. This means, of course, that the commercial fishermen must be allowed to take some game-food fish. But this is not easy to police by game wardens.

If this statement tends to upset the hook and line fishermen, Frank feels that the perch population would increase if sport anglers were allowed to keep more walleye. Walleye feed on perch, and the larger the walleye population the smaller will be the schools of perch. So a larger walleye creel limit is his answer to boosting perch catches.

Last edited by Bantam3x; 03-06-2012 at 08:32 AM. Reason: added link
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Old 03-06-2012, 08:36 AM   #63
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great article, thanks for posting! that place still has the biggest bullheads i've ever caught
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Old 03-06-2012, 02:34 PM   #64
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So there is Pike in there.....one morning fishing topwater for bass a swear i seen a pike blast out of the water after my topwater rapala...and how good is the walleye population in there i have yet to catch one....sweet article by the way
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Old 03-06-2012, 02:36 PM   #65
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the perch run very small in hodgson CJ
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Old 03-07-2012, 01:15 AM   #66
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What part of wingfoot if you don't mind me asking

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Old 03-07-2012, 01:28 AM   #67
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So there is Pike in there.....one morning fishing topwater for bass a swear i seen a pike blast out of the water after my topwater rapala...and how good is the walleye population in there i have yet to catch one....sweet article by the way
The walleye pop. was pretty good years ago when Frank Bezdek stocked them and also the Goodyear H&F club. (I worked with Frank when I worked for Goodyear.) Since we neverwere able to verify reproduction, all the fish harvested were stocked and grew up in Wingfoot. People who targeted them could catch a few anytime they wanted. There likely are a few still left and they should be real trophies. I predict someone will catch a huge walleye this year from there due to the increased fishing pressure. Pike were also stocked but so long ago, I'd say there prob, aren't any left. Frank died in 1990 and his work done there was in the early to mid 80's-that article is quite old.

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Old 03-07-2012, 07:31 AM   #68
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Originally Posted by c. j. stone View Post
The walleye pop. was pretty good years ago when Frank Bezdek stocked them and also the Goodyear H&F club. (I worked with Frank when I worked for Goodyear.) Since we neverwere able to verify reproduction, all the fish harvested were stocked and grew up in Wingfoot. People who targeted them could catch a few anytime they wanted. There likely are a few still left and they should be real trophies. I predict someone will catch a huge walleye this year from there due to the increased fishing pressure. Pike were also stocked but so long ago, I'd say there prob, aren't any left. Frank died in 1990 and his work done there was in the early to mid 80's-that article is quite old.

My brother Merle ran the Eng. Club in the 70's/80's. Man the Walleye we used to catch.
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Old 03-12-2012, 09:56 AM   #69
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oh i c sweet article though!
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Old 03-12-2012, 09:57 AM   #70
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Oh and the wingfoot perch are not hittin lol..or rather harder to find...good hunting!
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Old 03-12-2012, 11:06 AM   #71
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Bantam3X I doubt if you see the state do any of these things at Wingfoot except maybe lower the lake some over the Winter. Goodyear paid Bezdek to do these things to the lake to improve it but Goodyear doesn't own it anymore. They also aerated the lake which has been discontinued.
Pike haven't been stocked in there for many years so it's not likely you'll catch any but you never know. As for Walleyes it would be nice if the state would stock some in there now and then but according to Phil Hillman they can't reproduce in there so it wouldn't be cost effective to stock them.
I did the online anglers survey a year or two ago and in it under comments I said since the price of gas is so high it would nice if the state would stock some walleyes in there now and then so people in this area could cacth some good eating fish close to home and not have to drive over twenty miles one way to catch some. I haven't heard anymore about that and the price of gas is definitely rising.
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Old 03-12-2012, 02:54 PM   #72
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I was in a boat around noon on a cold late March day years ago(like 25) with Frank Bezdek and Frank Balint, Park Mgr for Goodyear when the test net was pulled from a "secret" spot(which I cannot divuldge without payment!).
It contained several nice perch, gills, crappie, and there were 4-5 walleye from 1.5-3#s. This after only being in there from the evening before. Those were Wingfoot's "good ole days"! With a little funding, the State could restore this to the fishing gem it once was. But, as whaler said, I also doubt they will.
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